WAITING AMONG THE ROSES

ROSE GARDEN FOUNTAIN

Among the natural beauty of New Orleans City park you can find artistically designed stone statues. One such statue finds its home in the Rose Garden. The Shriever Fountain was designed by artist Enrique Alférez in 1932. It peacefully rest within the flowers waiting to be noticed.

THE PRESBYTERE

PRESBYTERE

The matching bookend to the Cabildo is the Presbytere. Almost an exact mirror, the plans were set in motion after the great fire of 1788. The building’s construction developed over many years coming to an end in 1847 with the addition of the matching roof. Through its history the Presbytere has housed apartments, government offices, courts, and now a museum. This northern side of Jackson Square serves as the perfect backdrop to sit awhile or meet up with friends.

CORNSTALKS IN NOLA

CORNSTALK

When you think of wrought iron fences and railings you typically picture simple pickets or ornate lace. Here in New Orleans you can find a fence built to resemble a cornstalk field. The fence was constructed around 1840 by the homeowner for his beloved wife, whom, as the story goes, was home sick for her native Iowa. The French Quarter home now turned hotel has a sister fence somewhere in NOLA, Have you seen it?

ROYAL STREET SHOPPING

ROYAL STREETWeekends in NOLA are not short on things to do. One great way to spend time is shopping on Royal St. in the French Quarter. With building against building it makes each shop entrance almost flow to the next. Their is something unique about shopping while surrounded by the sound of musicians and the New Orleans charms in the French Quarter.

AUDUBON ZOO

AUDUBON ZOO SIGN

The Audubon Zoo is one of Audubon Nature Institutes’ most treasured establishments. The Zoo’s history can be traced back as far as the 1884 World Expo. The current zoo started as a simple “flight cage” and in the 1920s saw substantial growth. “So c’mon down to the Audubon Zoo where they all ask for YOU!”

SKY BLUE

 

BLUE CEILING 07 25On many of the homes in NOLA you will find the ceiling of the porch is painted a light sky blue, this is sometimes referred to as “Haint Blue.” It is believed to have been done for a plethora of reasons, from a way to confuse insects into thinking it’s the sky and not a ceiling, to the idea that blue is a lucky color, or it is just plain calming. One of the reasons that sticks out for us, is the idea that it was started as a way to ward off evil spirits, or Haints. While this is not a New Orleans tradition but a part of Southern Victorian Architecture, we feel it fits right at home in NOLA.

FLOWERING PASTURES

STB FLOWERS 07 24

Open pastures are a rare sight in a city like New Orleans, full of historic structures and busy modern streets. But venture southeast “down the road” to St. Bernard Parish and find an area which embraces it’s agricultural roots. Lying only 10 minutes outside NOLA following the path of the Mississippi, passing the dense urban neighborhoods of the city limits, the scene gradually turns to open spaces and fields. On this bright and sunny day the fields were untended and filled with small yellow flowers for as far as the eye could see.